Yamaha CDX-550E

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YAMAHA CD

1982

The first CD player designed with our own aesthetics of sound and appearance.

CD-1

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Yamaha released its first CD player in 1982, just after the birth of the CD. Its groundbreaking features included a slide-out disc loading drive mechanism rather than tray-loading, component-style front controls, a mirror that let you see the recorded side of the spinning disc, and an LED bar graph that showed the approximate position of the pickup. For an era familiar only with the analog record, it was probably a natural assumption that the disc and pickup were meant to be seen during play. The choices for a main device were still limited, but this unit straightforwardly emphasized the sonic difference with linear 16-bit twin D/A converters and separate power supplies for the digital and analog elements. It was also technically unique, with a custom IC developed in-house at the heart of its control system. More than 30 years later, the attention to every detail and clean styling of the Yamaha aesthetic have not lost their luster.

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1983

The ultimate version of the CD-1 series, which changed the preconception that “CD sound has no personality”

CD-1a

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1983

Our original best-selling CD player that broke the $499 USD barrier for the first time.

CD-X1

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1985

A second generation high-grade unit that used our unique VMA method to focus on mechanical vibrations during CD playback.

CD-2000 / CD-2000W

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1986

Featuring the world’s first 18-bit precision D/A conversion system, this product ignited the high bit arms race.

CDX-2200

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1987

A special release bringing together all the values of separate units in one model to honor the 100th anniversary of Yamaha.

CDX-10000

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1987

Reached an incredible 118 dB S/N ratio thanks to eight times oversampling.

CDX-2000

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1988

The ultimate in high-bit digital, with eight fs, 22-bit operation and a four DAC configuration.

CDX-2020

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1991

Embodying the GT concept, a superlative CD player that took audio back to its origins.

GT-CD1

Yamaha DSP-1

In 1986, Yamaha unveiled a revolutionary new product to the UK. It was the first of its kind and used a new concept in sound reproduction: Digital Sound Field processing. That product was the DSP-1 and it’s where the Yamaha Electronics UK story begins.

Yamaha hi-fi products had been available in the UK via separate distributors since 1975. Yamaha Electronics UK (YEUK) was set-up eleven years later so that the company could focus on the DSP-1 and capitalise on new opportunities for home entertainment such as multi-channel music and home cinema.

Using Sound Field processing – later to become known as Digital Signal Processing (DSP) – the DSP-1 was the only product of its kind to actually reproduce the acoustics of real live concert venues. Music isn’t just about the sounds of instruments and voices. It’s also about the space and physical characteristics of live music venues. The true ambience of the venue therefore enhances the spirit and realism of listening to music at home.

The DSP-1 had four channels and sixteen different surround modes which even included pitch change. This could, for example, allow you to have a soprano singing in one speaker, a tenor in the other and a baritone from the other stereo pair! Impressive stuff. But at the time, Yamaha dealers saw problems. “You’ll never get all those boxes and speakers in people’s homes”, was one response. But they were to be proved wrong. 

Even as those words were spoken, Yamaha’s Japanese designers were already working on new Digital Sound Field Processors like the DSP-100 and AVX-100. These products – and their successors – not only revolutionised the way we listen to music at home, but they created an entirely new concept in entertainment: home cinema. And it is Yamaha Electronics UK that has pioneered that revolution.

For over 100 years Yamaha’s presence has resulted in establishing a very successful and renowned brand name. We have provided many customers with products for both work and leisure, which have given extreme enjoyment and fulfilment in their ownership experience.
The Yamaha DSP-1 was a revolutionary piece of early home theater surround soundequipment, produced in 1985 by the Yamaha Corporation. The DSP-1 (referred to by Yamahaas a Digital Sound field Processor) allowed owners to synthesize up to 6-channels of surround sound from 2 channel stereo sound via a complex digital signal processor (DSP). Much like today’s home theater receivers the DSP-1 offered sixteen “sound fields” created through the DSP including a jazz club, a cathedral, a concert hall, and a stadium. However, unlike today’s receivers, these sound field modes were highly editable, allowing the owner to customize the effect to his or her own personal taste. The DSP-1 also included an analog Dolby Surrounddecoder as well as other effects such as real-time echo and pitch change.
Oddly, most of the DSP-1’s controls are on the unit’s remote control. This can make it difficult for collectors to find a complete functioning unit.

Programma’s op de DSP-1

  PROGRAMMA  SOUND EFFECTOR ACOUSTIC
SURROUND
1 1 DELAY HALL 1
2 2 STEREO ECHO HALL 2
3 3 STEREO FLANGE A HALL 3
4 4 STEREO FLANGE B CHAMBER
5 5 CHORUS A Münster
6 6 CHORUS B CHURCH
7 7 STEREO PHASING JAZZ CLUB
8 8 TREMOLO ROCK CONCERT
9 9 SYMPHONIC DISCO
10 10 ECHO ROOM PAVILION
11 11 PITCH CHANGE A WAREHOUSE LOFT
12 12 PITCH CHANGE B STADIUM
13 13 PAN L – TURN PRESENCE
14 14 PAN R – TURN SURROUND 1
15 15 PAN F-R SURROUND 2
16 16 PAN L-R DOLBY SURROUND

De YAMAHA DSP-1

Is een surround sound Digital Audio Processor

Een schitterend audio apparaat om natuurlijk surround sound te creëren

De DSP-1 werd in 1986 op de markt gebracht door Yamaha

Dit was de eerste Digital Sound Processor op de markt.
Hier begon het homecinema gedoe van nu……………

De set bestond toen uit ;

DSP-1 2499.- gulden
MVS-1  399.- gulden
M-35     699.- gulden

Een hoop centen waren dat toen.
Ik was niet tevreden met de MVS-1 en de M-35 en heb daarvoor twee Onkyo’s A-8130 gekocht. Dat gaf een giga voordeel, omdat je de klankkleur ook nog een keer apart in kon stellen.